Tag Archives: Proline

Amino Acids Among Anti-Aging Bio-Molecules

Amino acids are among a number of specific types of bio-molecules that help restrict the aging process. Antiaging creams and lotions and supplements are only a few ways to deal with wrinkles and skin issues from a topical advantage, but what about the rest of the body? Anti-aging mechanisms, healing and immunity, skin (our largest organ), and other biological processes require an internal process at the cellular level for really slowing the aging process.

A review by P Dabhade and S Kotwal from the University Department of Biochemistry, RTM Nagpur University, in India wrote a publication titled: Tackling the aging process with bio-molecules: a possible role for caloric restriction, food-derived nutrients, vitamins, amino acids, peptides, and minerals.

The researchers said that “Aging is a multifactorial process leading to general deterioration in many tissues and organs, accompanied by an increased incidence and severity of a wide variety of chronic, incurable, and often fatal diseases” and that these therapies “include potential dietary interventions, adherence to nutrition, hormonal and cell-based therapies, genetic manipulations, and anti-aging supplements or nutrients.” Amino acids are among them.

Amino acids help with anti-aging at the cellular level

True healing comes from within, and the anti-aging process is no different. The body regenerates at the cellular level, so aiding the body in fundamental ways is crucial to keeping the body youthful. This can mean environmental changes we can control, like one’s diet, includes eating nutrient-rich foods (many people also claim their skin was the most obvious change they noticed when they ate a raw vegan diet because the skin hydrates from underneath).

Among the supplements and nutrients that are listed for anti-aging processes includes, vitamins, minerals, peptides, as well as amino acids. Protein foods like meats can provide all 22 amino acids since aminos are the building blocks of protein. Eating whey protein and eggs provide essential amino acids to the body, but extending the lifespan can get more detailed. The researchers who published the review named above focused mainly on these strategies for slowing down the aging process: caloric restriction, good food, and nutritional supplements, among which include amino acids.

Amino acids that are specifically good for anti-aging

Some of the amino acids below serve specific functions in the body:

Taurine helps repair muscle tissue, which tends to wane in the elderly

Creatine is produced by L-arginine and methionine, which come from carnitine, and help produce healthy skin.

L-arginine also helps reduce inflammation and erectile dysfunction (ED), and serves as a metabolism booster.

L-carnitine and carnosine help support cardiovascular health– carnitine helps with skin health, weight management, and energy, plus reduces peripheral vascular disease symptoms and heart angina, while carnosine lowers cholesterol and also reduces the risk of atherosclerosis.

L-glutamine stores sugar as glycogen instead of fat in the body, and is important for skin health.

Cysteine is a powerful detoxifier and required along with glutamine and glycine in order to make glutathione. The Washington Times called the amino acid glutathione an anti-aging machine!

Aging is progressive, irreversible, and a universal human phenomenon. Utilizing amino acids and other supplements may help protect against damage to molecules such as proteins, DNA, lipids, organs, and our cells protects against diseases like heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, arthritis, and osteoporosis.

Taking amino acids, among other supplements, and eating a healthy diet aids cellular mechanisms and may help you live longer. Please check with your doctor before taking any supplements.

References:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23451844

http://www.studymode.com/essays/Submission-619316.html

http://aminoacidinformation.com/?s=anti-aging

Table of Amino Acid Abbreviations

Students and teachers come together with terms like “Amino acid abbreviations” – but scientists use these abbreviated forms to refer to the 20+ names of amino acids as well.

Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins, and they can be gotten from food. Before we get into the amino acid abbreviations you may want to know that there are two main types of amino acids (with a few exceptions)…

Essential and Non-essential amino acids

Essential amino acids does not mean they are “essential” as in necessary… it simply means that they can only be gotten from the food you eat so must be included through diet or dietary supplementation. Protein foods like meats (beef, chicken, pork, etc.) and eggs, as well as fish, are excellent sources of amino acids. Many meat-eating Americans actually eat an overabundance of protein compared with what the human body requires, which can lead to acidity (which leads to disease), cardiovascular and other diseases.

Non-essential amino acids are those that your body can produce naturally. Occasionally, someone is born with a deficiency in their body’s ability to produce the amino acids necessary for proper functioning, leading to diseases or disorders where people have trouble breaking down certain amino acids. An example of the latter is Maple Syrup Urine Disorder (MSUD) which is what newborn babies are screened for soon after birth.

There are 22 different amino acids in all (some of them semi-essential), but about 20 of them are more common. Their names, 3-letter, and 1-letter amino acid abbreviations follow.

Table of amino acid abbreviations

Amino Acid

3-Letter

1-Letter

Alanine

Ala

A

Arginine

Arg

R

Asparagine

Asn

N

Aspartic acid

Asp

D

Cysteine

Cys

C

Glutamic acid

Glu

E

Glutamine

Gln

Q

Glycine

Gly

G

Histidine

His

H

Isoleucine

Ile

I

Leucine

Leu

L

Lysine

Lys

K

Methionine

Met

M

Phenylalanine

Phe

F

Proline

Pro

P

Serine

Ser

S

Threonine

Thr

T

Tryptophan

Trp

W

Tyrosine

Tyr

Y

Valine

Val

V

Aspartic acid or Asparagine

Asx

B

Any amino acid

Xaa

X

Termination codon

TERM

For more information on amino acid abbreviations or more detailed information on amino acids in general, please see other articles at the Amino Acid Information Center. There are also many excellent resources on the Internet or in encyclopedias.

Reference:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Class/MLACourse/Modules/MolBioReview/iupac_aa_abbreviations.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amino_acid#In_human_nutrition

http://www.newbornscreening.info/Parents/aminoaciddisorders/MSUD.html

Amino Acids Lysine, Proline, Arginine To Treat Prostate Cancer

A study into the anti-tumor effects of specific nutrients has led to positive results. A unique amino acids-plus formulation of lysine, proline, arginine, ascorbic acid, and epigallocatechin gallate was proved to have anticancer properties, and could become a natural anticancer agent to treat prostate cancer. 

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men, after skin cancer. In fact, about 1 man in 6 will be diagnosed with prostate cancer (U.S. data). But prostate cancer can often be treated successfully, especially if detected early.

Prostate cancer can often be found by testing for a prostate-specific antigen in the blood. A digital rectal exam is also a common screening technique. Once diagnosed and staged, prostate cancer can be treated with surgery, radiation therapy, cryotherapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and other treatments.

Because some treatments, like chemotherapy, have severe side effects, scientists worldwide are studying new, non-toxic anti-cancer therapies, including some amino acids.

Amino acids nutrient study results: proliferation of prostate cancer cells reduced

Researchers Roomi MW, Ivanov V, et al, from the Matthias Rath Research, Cancer Division, Santa Clara, USA, developed a unique formula containing specific amino acids to treat prostate cancer cell lines.

Various concentrations of the amino acids lysine, proline, and arginine, were combined with ascorbic acid and epigallocatechin gallate. This mixture was tested on prostate cancer cell lines in vitro. The proliferation, or growth, of prostate cancer cells was measured.

Lysine is one of the essential amino acids, which means we must ingest it since our bodies cannot produce it by themselves. The two amino acids proline and arginine are synthesized in our bodies, though of course all amino acids can be consumed as supplements or can come from eating certain protein foods, including meats.

Results of the study were impressive. The amino acids-plus mixture produced a dose-dependent inhibition of some of the prostate cancer cell lines. The researchers concluded that the lysine, proline, and arginine amino acids, ascorbic acid, and epigallocatechin gallate mixture could become a potent anticancer agent, and could be a new treatment for prostate cancer.

Sources:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17564322

Collagen and L-Proline: Skin Care Benefits

L-proline is one of the amino acids, which are the building blocks of proteins. There are two major groups of amino acids, essential and non-essential. L-proline is a non-essential amino acid, which means your body can produce it naturally when needed. L-proline plays an important role in two key areas of health, production of collagen, and reduction of the effects of atherosclerosis. Let’s look at why those are important for your health, and how L-proline helps keep you healthy.

Collagen is a collection of proteins that your body produces naturally, and they help maintain the structure of connective tissues. Your tendons, ligaments, and skin are some examples of the connective tissues that rely on L-proline for structure. However, L-proline also provides the structure for muscle cells, bone cells, and blood cells. So it’s easy to see why L-proline is an important factor in our body’s health. In addition, because L-proline helps with the production of collagen, it is vital to keep your skin looking young and fresh.

Additional L-Proline Benefits

Beyond that, another important role L-proline plays in your health is its ability to reduce the effects of atherosclerosis. It acts like a lubricant for fat globules, meaning they can pass through your bloodstream more easily. Moreover, L-proline allows fat globules already deposited on the blood vessels to be freed and thus pass through your bloodstream. A study by Mathias Rath has shown that L-proline can not only reduce the effects of atherosclerosis, but can actually prevent coronary artery disease.

Because the body can synthesize L-proline naturally, people do not need to rely strictly on supplements. L-proline can be found in a variety of foods, such as meat, dairy products, and eggs. However, the amounts our body synthesizes are frequently inadequate, and people who are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease should consider taking supplements to improve their cardiovascular health. Of course, as with all things health related, if you have any doubts as to whether a supplement is right for you, you should consult with a physician.