Tag Archives: ornithine

Part 1: Amino Acids for Men – Virility and Libido (Arginine)

The amino acids for men are the same ones that can be taken for women; however, there are specific aminos that help stimulate biological processes and boost sexual performance and virility. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common issue for middle-aged to older men or men with prostate problems. The consequences include a drop in self-confidence, and reduced virility, fear, anxiety, potency, and sometimes close relationships, which can lead to depression. Amino acids for men and these issues, however, may help offset some of these symptoms.

Sexual performance can have a positive effect on men’s sexual health. Specifically, the amino acids for men include arginine and ornithine. I will cover arginine here in part 1, and ornithine in part 2 of this article.

Amino acids for men – arginine

Arginine is a precursor for NO (nitric oxide), which has health benefits for the body. By increasing arginine in the body, nitric oxide will increase as well, which dilates the blood vessels and helps with blood circulation. Blood circulation is what also affects the penis.

Truly this is one of the best amino acids for men available because the nitric oxide already improves arterial elasticity, which can help reduce blood pressure as well as improve erectile processes as well. Nutrients and oxygen can also be transported more efficiently to the organs. All of this together can have a positive effect on sexual performance, endurance, and potency.

Arginine is one of those amazing amino acids for men that have no side effects. Plus it is less expensive than synthetic pills. Of course, it is does not work immediately as virility takes a few days to show up; however, the harmless qualities of arginine makes it a viable alternative or supplement.

Erectile dysfunction (ED) has been studied, says Amino Acid Studies, by pharmacologists like Professor Dirk Stichtenoth at the Institute for Clinical Pharmacology whom said, “Initial evaluations indicate positive effects” for arginine and ED. In their study at Cologne University in 1999, 26 patients with potency issues were prescribed arginine (1500mg/day). In only seven weeks a significant improvement was experienced by 73% of the participants in their erectile function.

A similar study was done in Tel Aviv University around the same time with 46 men who had ED with 31% increase in sexual function. Of all the amino acids for men out there, arginine is one of the most highly prized for the benefits for virility and potency, with absolutely no side effecs.

CONTINUE TO Part 2: Amino Acids for Men – Virility and Libido (Ornithine)

Reference:

http://www.aminoacid-studies.com/areas-of-use/virility-and-libido.html

Part 2: Amino Acids for Men – Virility and Libido (Ornithine)

Continued from Part 1: Amino Acids for Men – Virility and Libido (Arginine), we discussed how the amino acid arginine has no side effects but may help with erectile dysfunction (ED) and potency in men. Now I will discuss the amino acid ornithine and why it is a perfect match as a supplement to go with arginine.

Ornithine and arginine are both considered excellent amino acids for men.

Amino acids for men – ornithine

First of all, let me say that, like arginine, ornithine is side effect-free. Plus ornithine is “reduced to arginine in the body,” says Amino Acid Studies, “but this occurs very slowly, so that its effects last a long time.” There is something about combining these two aminos that sets up the body for overall regeneration, which helps vitality in a big way (no pun intended).

Erectile dysfunction (ED) and erectile capabilities have shown positive support in men who take ornithine, especially when it is taken in conjunction with arginine. These improvements can lead to a boost in the self-confidence in men’s sexuality and drive.

Normally the body can produce amino acids for men—like arginine and ornithine—by itself or can be gotten through food (particularly meats like fish, chicken, beef, turkey, pork, or even eggs), but sometimes the body, left to its own devices or for one reason or another (age, genetics, diet, etc.), does not make sufficient quantities of ornithine or arginine.

If the body cannot produce these amino acids for men by itself, then one has to look into the reasons why this is happening. Typically one can take amino acid supplements, but reasons for this could include stress, or even illness. Illness is more obvious as a reason for people to realize that the body may not respond, but also stress can produce sometimes very strange results in a man’s (or woman’s for that matter) body that can manifest a variety of problems that one might think are not connected, but yet are. Virility, libido, and potency are sometimes affected by stress as well.

To cap this, both ornithine and arginine are the two amino acids for men that can easily be supplemented for men’s health support, specifically with sexual dysfunction such as erectile capabilities. Both of these amino acids are found in meats, eggs, and fish, and in lesser amounts in dairy, nuts, wheat, rice, and soybeans.

Both arginine and ornithine can generally be purchased at any supplement section of the supermarket or natural health food store, generally as powders, tablets, and capsules. Please check with your doctor to be sure you do not have something more serious going on with your health if you are experiencing erectile dysfunction.

Reference:

http://www.aminoacid-studies.com/areas-of-use/virility-and-libido.html

Amino Acid Supplement Improves Health: Study

An Australian study into amino acid depletion and sub-health has found promising results with a complex amino acid supplement.

Sub-health is an intermediate state between health and disease. Sub-health can be a chronic condition, usually indicated by low energy, loss of vitality, altered sleeping patterns, and increased incidence of viral infections. Sub-health can also lead to the debilitating medical conditions of chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia.

Many illnesses can result in amino acid depletion. Amino acid imbalance is often found in cancer-related fatigue, for example. Could amino acid imbalance also result from sub-health? If so, would correcting this imbalance improve health?

Some amino acids are synthesized in the body, but the essential amino acids are obtained through food.

If people are unable to ingest the correct quantities of essential amino acids in their diet, they are often given amino acid supplements to correct the imbalance. However, these supplements contain a complex formula of ingredients. In addition to perfecting the formula, developers must ensure the taste is palatable.

Amino acid supplement study

Researchers (R Dunstan, S Sparkes, et al) with the School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Australia, developed a study into the new, broad-spectrum amino acid dietary supplement, Fatigue Reviva (developed by TOP Nutrition Pty Ltd).

17 men reporting symptoms of sub-health took part in the 30 day trial. After the trial, 65% of the study group reported that their energy levels had significantly improved.

Urinary amino acid analysis revealed that the supplement increased the levels of valine, isoleucine and glutamic acid, and reduced levels of glutamine and ornithine.

However, some participants reported gastrointestinal symptoms. The researchers believed these symptoms were caused by the prebiotic fructooligosaccharide, an ingredient in the supplement. Further product development is needed for those patients susceptible to fructooligosaccharide.

The study concluded that this amino acid supplement could prevent fatigue, and increase wellbeing, for patients with symptoms of sub-health.

Sources:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23927677

Table of Amino Acid Abbreviations

Students and teachers come together with terms like “Amino acid abbreviations” – but scientists use these abbreviated forms to refer to the 20+ names of amino acids as well.

Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins, and they can be gotten from food. Before we get into the amino acid abbreviations you may want to know that there are two main types of amino acids (with a few exceptions)…

Essential and Non-essential amino acids

Essential amino acids does not mean they are “essential” as in necessary… it simply means that they can only be gotten from the food you eat so must be included through diet or dietary supplementation. Protein foods like meats (beef, chicken, pork, etc.) and eggs, as well as fish, are excellent sources of amino acids. Many meat-eating Americans actually eat an overabundance of protein compared with what the human body requires, which can lead to acidity (which leads to disease), cardiovascular and other diseases.

Non-essential amino acids are those that your body can produce naturally. Occasionally, someone is born with a deficiency in their body’s ability to produce the amino acids necessary for proper functioning, leading to diseases or disorders where people have trouble breaking down certain amino acids. An example of the latter is Maple Syrup Urine Disorder (MSUD) which is what newborn babies are screened for soon after birth.

There are 22 different amino acids in all (some of them semi-essential), but about 20 of them are more common. Their names, 3-letter, and 1-letter amino acid abbreviations follow.

Table of amino acid abbreviations

Amino Acid

3-Letter

1-Letter

Alanine

Ala

A

Arginine

Arg

R

Asparagine

Asn

N

Aspartic acid

Asp

D

Cysteine

Cys

C

Glutamic acid

Glu

E

Glutamine

Gln

Q

Glycine

Gly

G

Histidine

His

H

Isoleucine

Ile

I

Leucine

Leu

L

Lysine

Lys

K

Methionine

Met

M

Phenylalanine

Phe

F

Proline

Pro

P

Serine

Ser

S

Threonine

Thr

T

Tryptophan

Trp

W

Tyrosine

Tyr

Y

Valine

Val

V

Aspartic acid or Asparagine

Asx

B

Any amino acid

Xaa

X

Termination codon

TERM

For more information on amino acid abbreviations or more detailed information on amino acids in general, please see other articles at the Amino Acid Information Center. There are also many excellent resources on the Internet or in encyclopedias.

Reference:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Class/MLACourse/Modules/MolBioReview/iupac_aa_abbreviations.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amino_acid#In_human_nutrition

http://www.newbornscreening.info/Parents/aminoaciddisorders/MSUD.html

L-Ornithine

L-Ornithine is an amino acid produced naturally in the human body.  Recent studies indicate that L-Ornithine may help you keep your liver healthy or even treat liver diseases. It can also help with weight loss, detoxify the body and promote lean muscle growth.

L-Ornithine is an amino acid produced naturally in the human body.  It is created when the amino acid L-Arginine is metabolized in the production of urea, which helps the body excrete nitrogen.

There are many benefits of L-Ornithine.  It encourages healthy liver function, and is often used in the treatment of cirrhosis of the liver.  Hepatic encephalopathy, an often fatal result of cirrhosis, can be treated and prevented by supplements.  Read more at http://www.livestrong.com/article/167836-l-ornithine-benefits/#ixzz2E3mxfrOw

L-Ornithine Benefits

L-Ornithine helps burn excess fat by releasing growth hormones.  It also helps detoxify the body and promote lean muscle growth.  These factors have encouraged many athletes and body builders to take L-Ornithine supplements to enhance their strength and body composition.  A 2010 study from Kanazawa University and Fukui University in Japan proves the effectiveness of these amino acid supplements in muscle growth: http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?paperID=1583

Independent studies from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and the University of Michigan Health System concluded that the normal production of L-Ornithine in the body can be inhibited by illness, injury or surgery.  Malnutrition and pregnancy are other conditions that may deplete the body’s L-Ornithine.

L-Ornithine helps detoxify the body, and also improves the immune system to help fend off viruses, bacteria, and tumor cells.  Many recovering patients take L-Ornithine supplements, also known as Ornithine-Aspartate or simply Ornithine, as well as eat Ornithine-rich foods.  The primary dietary sources of L-Ornitine are meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese and milk.

Stress can be reduced and energy can be increased by L-Ornithine.

L-Ornithine Side Effects: None

There are no known adverse side effects to taking L-Ornithine, although caution against high doses is recommended for those prone to kidney ailments.

While L-Ornithine is a natural product of mammals, fish and birds, the amino acid itself is sold in “free-form” supplements suitable for vegetarians.

Sources for the article included: