Tag Archives: histidine

Help COPD with Amino Acids for Lung Disease

According to some researchers and there are a few amino acids for lung disease that exist and may help such issues. COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is one of these lung conditions may be aided by amino acid supplements; in particular, those with even severe COPD. This lung disease affects the ability to breath and also reduces energy levels in those who have it. COPD may have different causes, but it can be a result of smoking cigarettes long term, as well as conditions such as emphysema. 

According to one study by RW Dal Negro, A Testa, et al., in Italy it was amino acids for lung disease that helped the patients with COPD. By supplementing COPD patients with certain essential amino acids they were able to determine if pulmonary rehabilitation might have improved health status and produce higher rates of physical performance.

Essential amino acids are several of the 22 commonly known amino acids. “Essential” means that they have to be gotten through diet since the body cannot produce them on its own. The list of essential amino acids may include: Valine, Threonine, Methionine, Leucine, Isoleucine, Phenylalanine, Tryptophan, Lysine, and Histidine.

Amino acids for lung disease – chronic COPD

A total of 88 COPD out-patients who had a 23 BMI (body mass index) or less were selected randomly to receive essential amino acids for lung disease (COPD) for a period of three months. After 12 weeks of the test period the patients receiving amino acids for lung disease had showed significant improvements in physical performance.

Also, the COPD patients scored higher on the SGRQ score (which measures breathing). Additionally, other areas were affected positively, as compared to the placebo group, who had taken the essential amino acids for lung disease (COPD), including improvements in: fat-free mass, serum albumin, increased muscle strength, oxygen saturation, and cognitive dysfunction.

The results produced greater confidence levels in the patients and the researchers for improvements in these symptoms that COPD usually negatively affects its patients. Essential amino acids may, then, help reduce symptoms of COPD, so it is clear that amino acids for lung disease can aid the patient in breathing easier as well as help their physical performance in a number of areas.

Source:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23193843

Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Amino Acids Cysteine, Glycine and Histidine

Inflammation in the body is like fire in the veins! But can inflammation be “cooled off” by the amino acids cysteine, glycine, and histidine? Inflammation is characterized as the bodily response of vascular tissues to unsafe stimuli. 

Such stimuli may include pathogens, irritants or damaged cells. Symptoms can vary in cases of inflammation, but the most common signs are redness, heat, swelling, pain, and loss of function in the affected area.

Because inflammation is a discomfort that affects a majority of the population at one time or another, researchers at Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine in Japan set out to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of the amino acids cysteine, glycine and histidine.

Researchers S. Hasegawa, et al., report that nuclear factor-kappa B is a system that regulates endothelial activation. They explain that nuclear factor-kappa B is induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha in vascular endothelial cells, and it is this process that can lead to inflammation and disorders such as atherosclerosis.

The researchers wanted to test the anti-inflammatory effects in coronary endothelial cells since results from previous studies ended inconclusively. They hypothesize that amino acids cysteine, glycine and histidine would produce inhibitory effects on nuclear factor-kappa B activation in human coronary arterial endothelial cells.

The effect of amino acids cysteine, glycine and histidine on inflammation in endothelial cells

For the study Hasegawa et al. took human coronary arterial endothelial cell cultures and treated them with either alanine, cysteine, glycine and histidine amino acids. They stimulated the cultures with 2 ng/mL of tumour necrosis factor-alpha before taking out nuclear extracts to determine their concentrations of proteins and nuclear factor-kappa B.

They found that without treatment, the cultures showed significant activation of nuclear factor-kappa B. But with pretreatment of cysteine, glycine and histidine, nuclear factor-kappa B activation was inhibited significantly in the coronary endothelial cells. Alanine did not have an effect on the activation, demonstrating no anti-inflammatory properties.

Overall, cysteine showed the most inhibiting effects out of the tested amino acids at any concentration. They also found that the amino acids inhibited E-selectin expression, a cell adhesion molecule that plays an important role in inflammation.

Based on these results, the researchers conclude that cysteine, glycine and histidine can help reduce inflammation to the endothelial cells.

Source:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22236003

Table of Amino Acid Abbreviations

Students and teachers come together with terms like “Amino acid abbreviations” – but scientists use these abbreviated forms to refer to the 20+ names of amino acids as well.

Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins, and they can be gotten from food. Before we get into the amino acid abbreviations you may want to know that there are two main types of amino acids (with a few exceptions)…

Essential and Non-essential amino acids

Essential amino acids does not mean they are “essential” as in necessary… it simply means that they can only be gotten from the food you eat so must be included through diet or dietary supplementation. Protein foods like meats (beef, chicken, pork, etc.) and eggs, as well as fish, are excellent sources of amino acids. Many meat-eating Americans actually eat an overabundance of protein compared with what the human body requires, which can lead to acidity (which leads to disease), cardiovascular and other diseases.

Non-essential amino acids are those that your body can produce naturally. Occasionally, someone is born with a deficiency in their body’s ability to produce the amino acids necessary for proper functioning, leading to diseases or disorders where people have trouble breaking down certain amino acids. An example of the latter is Maple Syrup Urine Disorder (MSUD) which is what newborn babies are screened for soon after birth.

There are 22 different amino acids in all (some of them semi-essential), but about 20 of them are more common. Their names, 3-letter, and 1-letter amino acid abbreviations follow.

Table of amino acid abbreviations

Amino Acid

3-Letter

1-Letter

Alanine

Ala

A

Arginine

Arg

R

Asparagine

Asn

N

Aspartic acid

Asp

D

Cysteine

Cys

C

Glutamic acid

Glu

E

Glutamine

Gln

Q

Glycine

Gly

G

Histidine

His

H

Isoleucine

Ile

I

Leucine

Leu

L

Lysine

Lys

K

Methionine

Met

M

Phenylalanine

Phe

F

Proline

Pro

P

Serine

Ser

S

Threonine

Thr

T

Tryptophan

Trp

W

Tyrosine

Tyr

Y

Valine

Val

V

Aspartic acid or Asparagine

Asx

B

Any amino acid

Xaa

X

Termination codon

TERM

For more information on amino acid abbreviations or more detailed information on amino acids in general, please see other articles at the Amino Acid Information Center. There are also many excellent resources on the Internet or in encyclopedias.

Reference:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Class/MLACourse/Modules/MolBioReview/iupac_aa_abbreviations.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amino_acid#In_human_nutrition

http://www.newbornscreening.info/Parents/aminoaciddisorders/MSUD.html

Amino Acid Chart

Many people know that you can get all 22 amino acids from protein foods such as meats (beef, chicken, pork, lamb, etc.), fish, and even eggs, but some people do not know how many plant-based amino acids in food there are, let alone which ones for which kinds of foods; I will cover some of them here in chart form for easy use.

Below is a breakdown of some of the essential amino acids that are in a variety of vegetarian (non-meat, non-dairy, non-egg, and non-fish) or vegan sources of foods… these are plant-based amino acids. The term “essential” amino acid means that you can only get these kinds of amino acids in food since your body cannot make them on its own.

Amino acids in food from plant proteins

According to the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) an adult needs about 0.8 to 1.0 g protein/kg of body weight. You can calculate this by dividing your weight (in lbs) by 2.2. That is how many grams you need each day of protein.

When you eat protein foods the proteins break down to their basic units called amino acids. Amino acids in food then help build back proteins within the body, needed by muscles, organs, and the immune system. About 15-25% of your daily calories should be from protein foods. Too much protein can strain the liver and kidneys.

Uses of amino acids in food

Arginine is considered as a semi-essential, or “conditional” essential amino acid depending on the health status and what stage of development the individual is in.

Histidine is most important during infancy (utilized for proper development and growth). It is essential for both adults and babies.

Isoleucine is used for muscle production, as well as maintenance and recovery. This is especially important after you have worked out/exercised. It helps in hemoglobin (in red blood cells) formation, blood clotting, energy, and regulating blood sugar levels.

Leucine is used in tissue production, repair, and production of growth hormone. It helps prevent wasting of muscles and is useful in treating Parkinson’s disease.

Lysine is used for calcium absorption, nitrogen maintenance, bone development, hormone production, tissue repair, and antibody production.

Methionine is used as a “cleaner” of the body… it helps emulsify fats, aids in digestion, is an antioxidant (helps prevent cancer), prevents arterial plaque, and removes heavy metals.

Phenylalanine is a precursor for the amino acid tyrosine and signaling molecules such as dopamine, epinephrine (adrenaline), and norepinephrine (noradrenaline), as well as the skin pigment melanin. It helps with memory and learning, elevates moods, and aids in brain processes.

Threonine monitors proteins in the body that processes to maintain and recycle.

Tryptophan is utilized for the production of niacin, serotonin, plus helps in pain management, mood regulation, and aids sleep.

Valine is for the muscles in recovery, endurance, and energy, plus it balances levels of nitrogen. It is also used in treating alcohol-related brain damage.

Amino Acid Chart of Food Sources

AMINO   ACIDS –> Arginine Histidine Isoleucine Leucine Lysine Methionine Phenylalanine Threonine Tryptophan Valine
almonds x x x x x
amaranth x
apples x x x x x x
apricots x
asparagus x x
avocadoes x
bananas x x x
beans x x x x
beets x x x x
black beans x
brazil nuts x x
broccoli x
brussels sprouts x x x
buckwheat x x
carrots x x x x x
cantaloupe x x x x x
cauliflower x x x
cashews x x x
celery x x x
chickpeas x
chives x x
citrus fruits x
coconut x
collards x x
cucumbers x x x
dandelion   greens x x x
endive x
fennel x x
flax seed x x x
garlic x x
grapes x x
greens x
green  vegetables x x
hazelnuts x x
kale x
kidney beans x x
leeks x
legumes x
lentil x
lettuce x x
lima beans x
mushrooms x
nori (seaweed) x x
nutritional yeast x x
nuts x x
oats x
okra x
olives
onion x
papayas x x
parsley x
parsnips x x
pears x x
peas x x
pecans x x
pineapple
pine nuts x x
pomegranates x x x
potatoes x x x
pumpkin seeds x
radishes
rice x
seaweed x
sesame seeds x
snap beans
spinach x
spirulina x
sprouts
squash x
sunflower   seeds x
tomatoes x x
turnip greens
turnips x
walnuts
watercress

There are certain other amino acids in food that could, or even should, be added to this amino acid chart, but this is a good start for most common vegetables, nuts, legumes, and other plant foods.

Amino Acid Chart Reference

http://yumuniverse.com/plant-based-protein-information-chart/

L-Carnosine Benefits: Can L-carnosine Become the Next Wonder Drug?

Found in abundance in muscles and the brain, the dipeptide L-carnosine is an organic compound comprised of the amino acids histidine and beta-alanine. Because of the various ways L-carnosine can benefit cellular activity, such as slowing down the growth of cataracts and certain tumour cells, researchers at Aston University in Birmingham decided to study the mechanisms behind how L-carnosine works.

In doing so, they believe that it could lead to breakthroughs in L-carnosine helping treat and prevent age-related ailments such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, type 2 diabetes and cancer.

Study for L-carnosine for health benefits, numerous diseases, even anti-aging

Scientists Alan Hipkiss, Stephanie Cartwright, Clare Bromley, Stephane Gross and Roslyn Bill believe that L-carnosine slows down age-related biological disturbances through energy metabolism or proteostasis, which is a type of protein stabilization process. Since L-carnosine also acts as an antioxidant, it has the potential to be used as a drug that can target multiple diseases.

They report that L-carnosine can act as a compound to combine the heavy metal that causes cell damage in the system. In doing so, L-carnosine will effective prevent lipids, proteins and DNA from undergoing age-related damage (antiaging properties).

The researchers recall another recent study that supports the theory that L-carnosine can improve cognition in people living with schizophrenia.

For Alzheimer’s disease, L-carnosine can act as a neuroprotective agent and has been shown to inhibit problems in the mitochondria. The dipeptide can also eliminate mutated polypeptides and stimulate the production of stress proteins that will further work to rebalance the system.

Overall, the researchers are very hopeful that the antioxidant and anti-senescence qualities of L-carnosine can greatly help cell deterioration due to old age. They reviewed studies that show L-carnosine can help slow cells that cause cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and alleviate symptoms of diabetes.

More comprehensive studies will have to be completed but the outlook is promising that L-carnosine can be an effective form of treatment for a variety of health problems.

Source:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23442334

Reduce Symptoms of Hemorrhagic Cystitis with Histidine

Histidine amino acid may help hemorrhagic cystitis for cancer patients. Hemorrhagic cystitis, a complication of the lower urinary tract, is characterized by painful urination and blood in the urine. Often caused by chemotherapy, bladder infections or pelvic radiotherapy, hemorrhagic cystitis is usually treated first with clot evacuation and elimination of any obstruction in the bladder outlet. 

But according to researchers at Urmia University’s Department of Pathobiology in Iran, another possible treatment for hemorrhagic cystitis is vitamin C and the essential amino acid histidine.

Histidine, an important component in the biosynthesis of histamine and carnosine, can be converted into ammonia, urocanic acid and even antioxidants. Because vitamin C and histidine both have antioxidant activities, the researchers hypothesize that a combination of the two would reduce the symptoms of hemorrhagic cystitis in rats.

For the experiment regarding histidine, researchers Amir Farshid, Esmaeal Tamaddonfard and Sepideh Ranjbar administered the drug cyclophosphamide to induce hemorrhagic cystitis in 48 rats through oxidative stress. They were then divided into groups given either saline alone as the control group, 200 mg/kg of vitamin C, 200 mg/kg of histidine, or a combination of vitamin C and histidine. The injections were administered three times at 2, 6 and 24 hours after induction of hemorrhagic cystitis. The researchers then collected blood samples and assessed any changes in the bladder wall.

The effects of amino acid histidine on hemorrhagic cystitis

After evaluating the data on plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC), the researchers found that injection of cyclophosphamide significantly decreased plasma TAC levels. This activity was reversed with separate and combined treatments of vitamin C and histidine, suggesting the experimental therapy recovered the negative symptoms of cyclophosphamide.

The same effect was shown with plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. As for histopathological changes in the bladder, the researchers found that histidine was able to significantly reduce all the negative changes in the bladder brought on by cyclophosphamide-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. Some of the negative changes include congestion, edema, hemorrhages and leukocyte infiltration of the bladder’s wall.

Based on the histidine related test results Farshid, Tamaddonfard and Ranjbar believe that a combination treatment of vitamin C and histidine will suppress any negative effects of hemorrhagic cystitis.

Please remember to visit our other health news portals, Medicinal Mushroom Information Center at http://medicinalmushroominfo.com Vancouver Health News at http://VancouverHealthNews.ca and http://todayswordofwisdom.com.

Source:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23716886