Tag Archives: GABA

Table of Amino Acid Abbreviations

Students and teachers come together with terms like “Amino acid abbreviations” – but scientists use these abbreviated forms to refer to the 20+ names of amino acids as well.

Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins, and they can be gotten from food. Before we get into the amino acid abbreviations you may want to know that there are two main types of amino acids (with a few exceptions)…

Essential and Non-essential amino acids

Essential amino acids does not mean they are “essential” as in necessary… it simply means that they can only be gotten from the food you eat so must be included through diet or dietary supplementation. Protein foods like meats (beef, chicken, pork, etc.) and eggs, as well as fish, are excellent sources of amino acids. Many meat-eating Americans actually eat an overabundance of protein compared with what the human body requires, which can lead to acidity (which leads to disease), cardiovascular and other diseases.

Non-essential amino acids are those that your body can produce naturally. Occasionally, someone is born with a deficiency in their body’s ability to produce the amino acids necessary for proper functioning, leading to diseases or disorders where people have trouble breaking down certain amino acids. An example of the latter is Maple Syrup Urine Disorder (MSUD) which is what newborn babies are screened for soon after birth.

There are 22 different amino acids in all (some of them semi-essential), but about 20 of them are more common. Their names, 3-letter, and 1-letter amino acid abbreviations follow.

Table of amino acid abbreviations

Amino Acid

3-Letter

1-Letter

Alanine

Ala

A

Arginine

Arg

R

Asparagine

Asn

N

Aspartic acid

Asp

D

Cysteine

Cys

C

Glutamic acid

Glu

E

Glutamine

Gln

Q

Glycine

Gly

G

Histidine

His

H

Isoleucine

Ile

I

Leucine

Leu

L

Lysine

Lys

K

Methionine

Met

M

Phenylalanine

Phe

F

Proline

Pro

P

Serine

Ser

S

Threonine

Thr

T

Tryptophan

Trp

W

Tyrosine

Tyr

Y

Valine

Val

V

Aspartic acid or Asparagine

Asx

B

Any amino acid

Xaa

X

Termination codon

TERM

For more information on amino acid abbreviations or more detailed information on amino acids in general, please see other articles at the Amino Acid Information Center. There are also many excellent resources on the Internet or in encyclopedias.

Reference:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Class/MLACourse/Modules/MolBioReview/iupac_aa_abbreviations.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amino_acid#In_human_nutrition

http://www.newbornscreening.info/Parents/aminoaciddisorders/MSUD.html

Valium (Diazepam) or GABA supplement?

Valium, also sold under a Diazepam brand name, is a a benzodiazepine drug. But would GABA amino acid supplement be as effective or even more potent than Diazepam?

According to Wikipedia, it is commonly used to treat anxiety, panic attacks, insomnia, seizures, spasms, restless legs syndrome    and  alcohol withdrawal.

GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) is called your brain’s natural Valium.  In fact, Valium or Diazepam was designed to mimic and enhance GABA’s calming impact.

GABA is both an amino acid and a potent mood enhancer and an inhibitory neurotransmitter which reduces the impact of other brain reactions such as the production of chemicals like adrenaline, the levels of which increase when you are under distress.  These reactions are called “excitatory”.

What happens when you take GABA amino acid?

When you take a GABA supplement, it may fully turn off your stress reaction to an external effect, enabling you to deal with a potential upset, and not become stressed at all.

On the other hand, if you are already stressed, taking GABA supplements can restore your calmness and getting rid of stress within minutes.

Some people can notice a difference already after 100 milligrams.  Personally, I do not feel any measurable effect until I increase the dose 15-fold.  This is one of the challenges with many dietary supplements including GABA and its stress reducing effect. You see, many supplement include various inactive ingredients that are used as lubricants in the production process.  They reduce the absorption rate. Secondly, the recommended daily dosage, if it exists, is a ‘one shoe size fits all’ -type of dosage.  With many natural compounds and dietary supplements including GABA, studies suggest that the response is dose-dependent.  In other words, a small girl might require 100 milligrams but a dramatically obese person with higher tolerance might require a much higher dosage.

Many supplement specialists recommend a maximum of 500 mg of GABA for stress and anxiety relief. They also recommend experimenting with the smallest amount to see how they respond.  My optimal level seems to be three times higher than the recommended 500 mg level.

Please note also that a smaller amount of GABA is intended to relax you, whereas a larger dose of GABA is intended to make you tired.

Pay attention to your reaction.  If you have an addiction, you are going through alcohol withdrawals and any other more serious issues for which your physician has prescribed you Valium or Diazepam or any other ‘benzo’ such Lorazepam, do not simply replace your prescription medicine with GABA dietary supplement. Discuss it first with your doctor.

Buy GABA Online:

GABA is available to purchase online. You can also find GABA at retailers such as GNC and Amazon.

GABA Side Effects

Have you been itching to try the amino acid GABA (gamma aminobutyric acid)? It has been known to help with a host of issues… it stimulates serotonin so helps with anxiety or depression, it helps you relax or is used as a sleep aid, helps panic attacks, improves focus, relieves ADHD symptoms, calms racing thoughts, can be used for pain relief, nervousness, stress, improves focus, helps you to lose weight, and promotes body building. Interestingly, among some other GABA side effects, it can also cause temporary itching!

The neural processing of the itch response was researched and studied by T Akiama and E Carstens of the University of California, Davis, Department of Neurobiology. They recognized that some of the neural mechanisms of itch include the use of the amino acid GABA (although their research was far more encompassing than just GABA side effects, it also included glutamate and a plethora of other mechanisms and biological processes).

Itching is an irritating issue to deal with, can be medically costly, as well as a socioeconomic issue. So what of GABA side effects?

GABA Side Effects Include:

The body naturally produces the chemical neurotransmitter Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA is one of 22 amino acids that are used by the body for various purposes. Amino acids can be gotten from food, particularly protein foods. Some of the GABA side effects from supplementing your diet with GABA may include:

–          Tickling, tingling, and itchy sensations (face, neck, and limbs)

–          Shortness of breath

–          sleepiness, or drowsiness

–          anxiety (in high doses)

–          lightheadedness

–          elevated blood pressure and heart rate

–          numbness in the face

–          nausea

–          vomiting

–          flushing sensation

–          fidgeting

–          increase in plasma growth-hormone levels

–          increase in prolactin levels

GABA Side Effects May Be More Severe if Taking Certain Medications

Be careful of GABA side effects if you are taking alcohol, barbiturates, or anti-anxiety drugs (benzodiazepine tranquilizers), or if you have biopolar or unipolar depressive disorders, are or pregnant or nursing.

Itchiness is one particular GABA side effect that appears to go away with time. Usually the itchiness just shows up the first 15 minutes or so after taking GABA.

A doctor can test you to find out if you are low in GABA, or help you with information and advice in case you are having any GABA side effects.

Reference:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23891755

http://www.livestrong.com/article/63549-side-effects-much-gaba/#ixzz2fgcoDcBB

http://extrahappiness.com/happiness/?p=3582#sthash.e2CXcHq7.dpuf

Amino Acids – Natural Cure For Alcoholism?

Could amino acids become a natural cure for alcoholism?  Based on the information in two great books by Julia Ross – “The Diet Cure” and “The Mood Cure”, this could certainly be the case.

According to Ross, overeating or drinking alcohol is actually a form of using food or alcohol as self-medication.  It is not about having poor willpower… it is because you are low on certain brain chemicals that make you emotionally strong.

Ross claims that if you are using alcohol to feel good – and the same applies to sugar and carbohydrate addictions – it is because something is interfering with your body’s ability to produce its own natural brain drugs.  What does this mean?  For example, a continuous stress lowers your natural sedative, stimulant and pain reliever reserves.  When you run out of them, your body wants to feel good and basically tells you to eat foods or drink alcohol – do anything that would fix the problem and make you feel good again.

Regular use of sugars, alcohol or drugs (even pharmaceutical drugs) can teach your brain not to produce those brain chemicals.  “Hey, why should I produce these neurotransmitters, when you are feeding me alcohol, doing the job for me,” your brain asks.  The more you condition your body with alcohol, the fewer neurotransmitters it produces.

What does this have to do with amino acids?  Everything!  Your brain relies on proteins, which are the only source for amino acids, and amino acids are what your body uses to make all of its mood-enhancing chemicals.  If you aren’t getting enough protein, or if you have conditioned your brain to interfere with the ‘conversion’ process, you start getting cravings.  This leads to an interesting conclusion: consuming amino acid supplements could become a natural cure for alcoholism and other sugar cravings.

Natural cure for alcoholism – false hope or a viable option?

In order to understand how you could use amino acid supplements to eliminate or reduce alcohol cravings and therefore gradually cure your alcoholism, it’s important to understand the role of various brain chemicals (neurotransmitters) that impact our mood.  They are a) dopamine/norepinephrine (improves mental focus and energizes you naturally), b) GABA (a Valium/Diazepam like natural sedative and relaxant), c) endorphin (a natural painkiller) and serotonin (helps you sleep and keeps you ‘happy’).

If you have plenty of all four, you are living a balanced life.  But when your reserves get depleted, you may resort to overeating and alcohol consumption.

If you want to learn the intricacies of exactly how amino acids work, we highly suggest that you read Julia Ross’s two great books.  However, if you have mood related issues, here is a list of amino acids that convert into proper brain chemicals, balancing your mood and potentially eliminating the need to use other substances, such as alcohol, carbohydrates or sugar.

The first brain chemical on our list, dopamine/norepinephrine increases your energy level.  The corresponding amino acid that produces the same effect is L-Tyrosine.  L-Tyrosine typically works fast and provides you with additional energy.

Some people eat chocolate or drink alcohol because they are tired and want that initial energy boost that comes from consuming those products.  If low energy level is your one of your problem areas, try L-Tyrosine and see if it could become part of your natural cure for alcoholism.

Then again, some people drink to relax.  GABA is often called natural valium (valium is also known as diazepam), which is used to relieve anxiety and other side effects associated with alcohol withdrawal, and L-Taurine can relieve tension as well.  L-theanine helps you reduce stress and relax as well. In other words, add these three amino acids for your natural cure for alcoholism toolkit!

Then there are those people who drink to get rid of emotional pain, the source of which they may not even remember anymore. There are two powerful amino acids that are used to alleviate emotional pain: L-glutamine and DLPA or DL-Phenylalanine. L-Glutamine is the second best choice for your body to fuel your brain.  Sugar – or glucose – is the primary option.  This makes it easy to understand why sugary products, carbohydrates or alcohol, which convert to glucose, are an easy way to stop a craving.  However, L-Glutamine amino acid reaches the brain within minutes.

The last amino acid, L-Tryptophan, is sometimes called “a natural Prozac”.  When a series of contaminated batches of L-Tryptophan came from Japan to the U.S. in the late 1980’s, the Food and Drug Administration banned it.  It is again available and is a very powerful product.  It plays an important role for the synthesis of melatonin and serotonin – hormones that regulate mood and stress response. L-Tryptophan helps support relaxation, sleep, positive mood and immune function. L-Tryptophan is the precursor to Serotonin, a neurotransmitter in the brain, which is deficient in people who have depression.

A ‘watered-down’ version, 5-HTP, is widely available in most health food stores.

I want a natural cure for alcoholism but I have no idea what to do next?

How much of each one of these amino acids should you take to address your emotional issues, cravings or even create a natural cure for alcoholism?  This is a difficult question to answer. Julia Ross provides detailed instructions in her books, including the dosage, what time of the day you should take each supplement and which one of these supplements should never be taken together – after all, why take energizing and relaxing supplements at the same time?

If you do not decide to read the works of Julia Ross or Dr. Joan Mathews Larson, who is often considered to be the inventor of this amino acid therapy to cure alcoholism naturally, then you will need to make your own educated decision on which supplements to use and determine the proper dosage.

While supplement bottles typically post a recommended dosage, please remember that certain inactive ingredients in supplements (used as lubricants in the manufacturing process) reduce the absorption of the product’s active ingredients.  If you follow dosage recommendations, and do not get the results you are after, get a copy of The Diet Cure and see the dose ranges that Dr. Ross presents.

Are amino acid therapies a natural cure for alcoholism? According to Dr. Larson, her detox center’s long-term success rates quadrupled from 20% to 80%, utilizing the strategies explained in this article.  If you are suffering from any addictions, including alcoholism, amino acids might be a long-sought after solution for you!

Midnight Snacks That Help You Sleep – GABA Insomnia Cure

So tonight I awoke at 2:30AM for the usual reasons—to go to the bathroom and get some water; however, my mind started racing and I couldn’t sleep. It’s an altogether too-common problem for many people. So what did I do? Well, first I wrote this article so it will help others, but secondly, I reached out to cure what ails me, foods containing GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) for a natural GABA insomnia cure.

GABA is an amino acid, and a natural cure for insomnia. Sure, I could take a prescription drug for insomnia, but I doubt my doctor can help me at this hour of the night. I could take an over the counter sleep aid (like allergy medicines: Excedrin PM, Tylenol PM, or Nytol—these contain diphenhydramine, which causes drowsiness and sometimes help people sleep) but why take something that is designed for allergies just to sleep?

I could also take a natural sleep aid supplement, such as GABA supplements, or a sleep aid that is a GABA insomnia cure? GABA medications that are also sleep medicines include: Ambien (zolpidem tartrate), Lunesta (eszopiclone), Ambien CR (zolpidem tartrate extended release), and Sonata (zaleplon)… but who wants to run to the local 24-hour drug store in the middle of the night?

What if a store near you is not even open? Why not simply walk to my kitchen for a moment and grab a snack that already a great source of GABA to help me sleep?

GABA insomnia cure: Foods in your kitchen that aid sleep

Food that triggers the brain’s neurotransmitters to help you sleep, GABA insomnia cure type foods are a quick and easy answer that works! I mean, does it make sense for you to grab drinks or foods that would keep you awake? Coffee, tea, soda pop, hot chocolate, or other drinks with caffeine do not make any sense in the middle of the night, so why eat foods that will keep you awake either?

Try a handful of raw nuts, particularly almonds (or even mixed nuts), especially if they are raw. Bananas also have GABA in them. Leftovers are also easy to snack on in the wee hours… consider any of these GABA insomnia cure foods: broccoli, brown rice, lentils, oranges/citrus fruits, beef liver, halibut, rice bran, spinach, walnuts, tree nuts, whole wheat, other whole grains like whole oats. Also, fish (mackerel in particular) and wheat bran are known to have some of the highest concentrations of GABA that are naturally occurring.

I always keep raw nut mix available to me at all times. I have already popped a handful of GABA-insomnia-cure natural sleep aid food into my mouth and am ready to lie down and rest my mind, and my body…

And with that, I bid you, goodnight… ZZZZZZZzzzzzzzzzzz…

References:

http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/features/sleeping-pills-what-need-know

http://extrahappiness.com/happiness/?p=3582

Amino Acid GABA Vital For Normal Brain Activity And Memory

Our brains use on average only 20% of our total energy. But how do they use it? Studying neurotransmitters like the amino acid GABA can lead to a greater understanding of schizophrenia, epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease.

Gamma-Aminobutyric_acid, or GABA, is a non-essential is an amino acid, which is created in our bodies from glutamic acid. It’s a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, essential in maintaining brain function. Simply put, GABA controls neuron activity and prevents nerve cells from firing too often, too quickly.

The activity of GABA in our brains can be measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A study by Lars Michels, Ernst Martin et al, from University Hospital Zurich in Switzerland, was developed to examine GABA neurotransmitter levels in the brains of volunteers performing certain tasks.

Would GABA levels be increased during performance? Would amino acid GABA levels be linked to reaction time and task accuracy? The researchers devised a match-to-sample working memory task, which subjects performed under magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Neurotransmitter GABA’s role in working memory

Working_memory is a theoretical concept, not an actual physical part of our brain. It’s the term for our brain’s ability to examine and manipulate new information. Working memory is associated with cognitive development, and studies show it declines with old age.

Sixteen healthy right-handed volunteers took part in the study. They were shown five letters for a stimulus period of 2 seconds. These letters had to be maintained in memory for a retention period of 5 seconds before a single letter appeared for a probe interval of 2 seconds. The subjects had to indicate by button press whether or not this single letter was part of the stimulus set.

Results showed that GABA levels increased significantly during the working memory test. The amino acid GABA therefore has an essential role in working memory.

Sources:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3317667/

What Can GABA Amino Acid Do For Me?

GABA amino acid supplements can help you with a number of things. This is a chemical that exists in all of us and plays an important role in how we live our lives.  Here is a little information on it so you can see whether or not it’s a good idea to use it as a supplement.

GABA is something that’s created in your body naturally and it is required to keep your mood in check.  It helps control the fight or flight response and this means that in a lot of people, it controls how much anxiety they feel. People that don’t have the correct balance of GABA amino acid chemicals in their brains are going to feel a lot of anxiety and may have a lot of manic behavior problems. This is why it’s important to take these kinds of supplements if you have any problems with these issues. If you’ve ever drank alcohol then you know that it lowers your inhibitions. This is because it acts on the part of the brain that is responsible for GABA production. When this balance is thrown off, then you’re more likely to do things that you wouldn’t normally do. When the alcohol wears off and you feel all of those anxious feelings, that is because your GABA balance is off. You can only make things better if you abstain from alcohol and use this kind of supplement for it to be effective. Speak with a doctor if you struggle with addiction. You should now know a little more about GABA amino acid and how it can help you if you need it. Make sure that if you do have any extra questions, you ask them to your doctor just so that you can be safe.

Read more comprehensive reports and scientific studies on GABA in the GABA section of our site.

This document was produced by a third party article provider. The opinions and statements are of that organization’s own and the owner and publisher of the site assume no responsibility for the accuracy of the content. Our articles are for informational, educational and entertainment purposes only. Please do your own due diligence, verify any health claims by doing additional research and consult your doctor before starting any supplementation program or making any lifestyle changes, including changes to your medication and supplementation.

Kill the Pain with Amino Acid GABA – Gamma-aminobutyric acid: Nature’s Pain Killer

Health Benefits of amino acid GABA: Pain Relief, Sleep, and Reduced Anxiety

GABA—known as Gamma-amnobutyric acid—is a chief neurotransmitter with inhibitory effects on the central nervous system of mammals. Because it plays a central role in regulating the excitement of neurons in the brain and nervous sytem, as well as muscle tone in humans, it can be used as a pain killer as since it not only reduces the perception of pain, but also has secondary effects that allows sleep and reduces anxiety once the pain is gone.

GABA is an amino acid, chemically speaking, but in medical and scientific fields it is referred to differently since it is not an alpha amino acid and is not technically incorporated into a protein either. However, Gaba-A and Gaba-B receptor sites in the brain do have a role to play in pain regulation, sleep, and anxiety parts of the human body and psyche.

Perception and mediation of pain: Pain killers as regulated by GABA amino acid

Defining the role of GABA regarding the perception and mediation of the transmission of pain has been attempted by SJ Enna and KE McCarson in the Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, at the University of Kansas Medical Center. They understand why GABA is nature’s pain killer.

Realizing that the central nervous system has GABAergic neurons that are distributed throughout the body, it is the spinal cord dorsal horn that also transmits the impulses of what it perceives as “pain” to the brain. GABA neurons and receptors not only perceive and respond to the stimuli, but these scientists admit that “this neurotransmitter system has been shown to regulate control of sensory information processing in the spinal cord.” This is why GABA plays such an important role in being a natural pain killer and is considered a novel analgesic.

One limitation to GABAergic drugs in the past has been the problem of sedation, or the induction of sleep, which is fine for patients who need to both receive sleep as well as pain relief from this natural pain killer source. However, because it helps with sleep, and not all patients want to sleep but just have the effects of a pain killer, it has shown to be of limited utility. Research continues with GABA-A and GABA-B receptor sites, with the latter being identified with antinociceptive (pain killer) responses “at doses well below those that cause sedation.”

This research has shown hope towards GABA as a pain killer regulator since “stimulation of neuroanatomically discreet GABA receptor sites could be of benefit in the management of pain.” It is good to know that continued research is being done in this area of natural pain killers via GABAergic drugs.

Reference:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17175808

L-glutamine Amino Acid and Depression

Is there a link between L-glutamine and depression?  Definitely!  It certainly appears that L-glutamine is a vital amino acid that increases positive outlook and relieves depression.  

L-glutamine is one of the major energy sources for the brain and without enough L-glutamine the brain relies on glucose for fuel which is why we crave sugar when we are stressed or sad.  Without enough fuel to function, the brain slumps and the result is a decrease in mental function, a sense of ‘the blues’ and a fundamental lack of motivation.

L-glutamine provides a healthy fuel for the whole body, not just the brain. Too much glucose can cause obesity, diabetes and many other diseases including cancers. Illness contributes to depression as well and it is important to keep the body healthy in order for the mind to be happy.  L-glutamine is a better fuel in this respect then glucose.

Connection between L-glutamine and depression may be in glucose balance

L-glutamine also helps relieve depression by being a more sustained, long burning fuel then glucose.  Glucose gives a large surge of energy that is inevitably followed by a crash that leaves the body craving more sugar and feeling depressed.  The result of this is addictive behaviour, a constant need to increase the amount of sugar ingested and that results in more feelings of depression.

Stress is also a frequent culprit for causes of depression.  Constant stress causes wear and tear on the whole body as a system, including the brain.  Stress also releases many hormones that result in feelings of unhappiness that can lead to long term depression. In order to heal from stress, the body needs to heal the damage done to its proteins and all of these damaged proteins can be synthesized from L-glutamine.  By taking L-glutamine to heal the damage caused by stress you can also prevent or help to recover from depression.

L-glutamine is a precursor to GABA – another relaxing amino acid

L-glutamine also enhances nervous system functions and is a precursor to the amino acid GABA.  GABA is an anxiety quelling amino acid and increased levels of GABA can help to prevent the stress from too much worry.  Worry can quickly lead to feelings of helplessness and depression.  L-glutamine helps by giving your body the building blocks to replenish its supply of GABA and gives the sense of competency to deal with anxiety and depression.

L-glutamine can be found in many high protein foods such as chicken, fish, beef, beans, dairy products, cabbage and beets. It can also be very useful to use a supplement to be sure to get all the L-glutamine you need to recover or prevent depression.

The author of this story, Michelle Carraway, is a freelance contributor to National Nutraceuticals’ online news portals, which include Medicinal Mushroom Information Center, Amino Acid Information Center, Vancouver Health News and Today’s Word of Wisdom.  The opinions are the writer’s own and the owner and publisher of the site assume no responsibility for the accuracy of the content. Our articles are for informational, educational and entertainment purposes only. Please do your own due diligence, verify any health claims by doing additional research and consult your doctor before starting any supplementation program or making any lifestyle changes, including changes to your medication and supplementation.

Sources:

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23031251

http://www.livestrong.com/article/477074-glutamine-depression/

http://www.sundancevideoonline.com/glutamine.html

http://www.practicalpainmanagement.com/treatments/nutraceutical/precursor-amino-acid-therapy

Amino Acid Taurine and Blood Pressure – New Way to Lower Blood Pressure?

Important news about the amino acid Taurine and blood pressure.  Cardiovascular health in men may be improved by the amino acid taurine, which may help lower blood pressure. Taurine is important for modulating cardiovascular function because it acts within the brain, affecting neurotransmitter receptor sites, as well as within peripheral tissues.

At the Center for Developmental Neuroscience at the City University of New York Graduate School, AE Idrissi, E Okeke, et al., did a study on male rats where IV injection of taurine caused tachycardia as well as hypotension. The Long-Evans control rats were freely moving, and a mere single injection of the amino acid taurine “significantly lowered the systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure.”

Aortic rings in the heart triggered GABA receptors by circulating GABA or taurine

In the study  it was taurine that was confirmed for its vasoactive properties using isolated preparations of the aortic rings. The pharmacological agents produced measurable mechanical responses of the aortic rings; it was found that the taurine caused an activated tonic-like effect of GABA-A receptors when either GABA or taurine were circulated.

This came as no surprise since previously it had been shown that taurine does indeed activate GABA-A receptors in the brain, which produces an apparent physiological response implying that “GABA(A)receptor activation is the relaxation of the arterial muscularis, vasodilation, and [causes] a decrease in blood pressure.”

Taurine has different effects on blood pressure depending on dosage… and gender!

This is where the study became interesting! There was evidently a difference between small steady doses of amino acid taurine supplementation (0.05% for four weeks) when taurine was put into the drinking water… it actually caused significant hypertension, which means that blood pressure actually increased, not decreased!  However, this effect was only witnessed in the female rats; according to the study: “males supplemented with taurine did not show an increase in systolic, diastolic, or mean arterial pressure.” Interestingly, both genders showed taurine administration still caused significant tachycardia, so it was suggested that the acute (a higher dose all at once) supplementation of taurine still had the health benefit of lowering their blood pressure overall. Only in females did it raise the blood pressure.

The limits are that no study was done on taurine administration to hypertensive rats. Also, there is no proof that what happens in rats will carry over to humans, but that taurine does indeed affect GABA-A receptors is well known, so more research needs to be done about the connection between taurine and blood pressure in humans. As always, be sure to discuss any supplementation of taurine or other amino acids with your doctor first.

Please remember to visit our sister site focusing on medicinal mushrooms at http://MedicinalMushroomInfo.com to learn about the amazing health benefits of medicinal mushrooms! And, if you live in the Vancouver, BC area, read Vancouver Health News at http://VancouverHealthNews.ca.

Reference:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23392950