Tag Archives: GABA amino acid

GABA: New Treatment To Improve Recovery After Stroke

Can adjusting the levels of the amino acid GABA improve post-stroke recovery? Results are positive in this animal study, which has led to new hope for stroke patients.

Stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide. And even if the stroke victim survives, the disturbance in the brain’s blood supply—the stroke—can cause brain damage. While some people can and do make a near-complete recovery, many are left with disabilities such as the inability to understand or to speak, or the inability to move limbs on one side of the body.

This damage is often so severe that one third of stroke survivors are confined to nursing homes or institutions.

A Clarkson, B Huang, et al, researchers at the Department of Neurology, The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, LA, USA, hoped to improve post-stroke recovery with drugs. They knew that, depending on the severity of the brain damage, the brain can repair itself after a stroke. The neurons in the brain re-map cognitive functions using non-damaged brain tissue.

The amino acid GABA is critical for this re-mapping process in the brain. GABA is the main neurotransmitter, which means it transmits the signals within the brain. GABA is actually synthesized in the brain, from the amino acid glutamate.

In this animal study, the researchers wanted to examine the brain’s ability to re-map if GABA levels were adjusted.

GABA studied in stroke trial

In this animal study, the researchers analyzed data from post-stroke mice. Stroke caused an increase in extrasynaptic GABA transmission. But when the GABA levels were decreased, the brains showed earlier, and more robust, motor recovery.

The researchers reported that timing is crucial when adjusting GABA levels. It can actually cause more brain damage if done too early. With the mice, the researchers found that delaying treatment until 3 days after stroke improved recovery.

The researchers concluded that targeting GABA helps the brain re-map its neural pathways, which enhances motor recovery. Targeting GABA is therefore a possible treatment in post-stroke recovery.

My personal experience with GABA

I love taking a GABA supplement and the benefits it proposes. It enhances my cognitive function and ensures that my brain is in optimal health. This study is more supporting evidence that brain supplements can be life changing to people all across the globe. If you’re looking for a high quality GABA supplement, look no further than Powdercity. Out of all the other vendors, I find them to be the highest quality, best price and fastest shipping. Their GABA can be found here: http://www.powdercity.com/products/gaba-powder and is offered in 100g, 250g, and 1kg quantities!

 

 

Sources:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21048709

Antiaging Treatments – GABA Amino Acid, Lifestyle, or Ikaria?

Antiaging treatments have included creams and lotions, or even food and potions. People and even experts say things like… drink this, eat that, live here, go there, exercise more, eat less, eat healthier, live in the Andes mountains, take this supplement (like GABA amino acid), take that supplement (like Reishi medicinal mushrooms). 

Antiaging may even include a move to Ikaria (known as Icaria, a Greek island) like Stamatis Moraitis did, according to the New York Times article entitled: The Island Where People Forget to Die, discussing how he overcame cancer merely by choosing to move back home and altering his lifestyle. Stamatis Moraitis is a centenarian, meaning he is over one hundred years old, and still alive and well, sharp as a tack, and happy and healthy.

Anti-aging techniques and treatments for some people may or may not include GABA amino acid supplements, or a lot of small changes in lifestyle (or major ones, depending), but one thing is for sure… it is not usually just one thing, but a combination of many. Longevity can include heredity/genetics as well as environmental factors.

Longevity and aging gracefully may include supplements like GABA amino acid

Aging is associated with the body’s cells breaking down over time and not functioning at the levels that they used to when people were younger. Cells die and are not regenerated the same way. To overcome physical or biological entropy it is often recommended that not just living somewhere or eating a certain way is key (although both can promote health benefits, depending on the person), but sometimes changing all the “little things” in life so that they add up to become the “big things” all by themselves.

Little things can include dietary changes, exercise regimens, breathing techniques and yoga, distressing, skipping fast food and eating fresh fruit instead, and even taking GABA amino acid supplements.

What can GABA amino acid supplements do for you?

According to a demographic study by SV Ukraintseva, KG Arbeev, et al., on antiaging treatments, many of them legally prescribed for thirty years, more or less, some of the “most common of the relevant medicines are nootropic piracetam, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), selegiline, Ginkgo biloba, pentoxifylline, cerebrolysin, solcoseryl, ergoloid, vinpocetin, sertraline, and estrogens, among others.” GABA amino acid is one of these popular items used for supplementation and antiaging.

GABA amino acid can have a variety of effects on your body, mind, and health. A general overview is covered in the article What Can GABA Amino Acid Do For Me?

GABA amino acid is also used to feel better, especially when one is in pain. Kill the Pain with Amino Acid GABA – Gamma-aminobutyric acid: Nature’s Pain Killer is an article on this very topic. Isn’t part of growing old feeling good and not being subject constantly to joints and inflammation, aches, and pains?

Additionally, protecting your brain and stimulating your senses and memory are key factors. Learning a language, or even knowing what GABA amino acid supplements can do to help your brain and memory or cognition can be read about here in Amino Acid GABA Vital For Normal Brain Activity And Memory. Memory is often a problem with dementia and Alzheimer’s as one gets older.

Although GABA amino acid is not the cure-all for all ailments, it is one of the many “little things” one can do to reduce pain, combat aging and restore a sense of youthfulness, health and wellness, and memory abilities. Perhaps it could still be included in many peoples’ little box of secret weapons against aging.

Sources:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15246996

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/28/magazine/the-island-where-people-forget-to-die.html?smid=fb-share&_r=0

GABA Side Effects

Have you been itching to try the amino acid GABA (gamma aminobutyric acid)? It has been known to help with a host of issues… it stimulates serotonin so helps with anxiety or depression, it helps you relax or is used as a sleep aid, helps panic attacks, improves focus, relieves ADHD symptoms, calms racing thoughts, can be used for pain relief, nervousness, stress, improves focus, helps you to lose weight, and promotes body building. Interestingly, among some other GABA side effects, it can also cause temporary itching!

The neural processing of the itch response was researched and studied by T Akiama and E Carstens of the University of California, Davis, Department of Neurobiology. They recognized that some of the neural mechanisms of itch include the use of the amino acid GABA (although their research was far more encompassing than just GABA side effects, it also included glutamate and a plethora of other mechanisms and biological processes).

Itching is an irritating issue to deal with, can be medically costly, as well as a socioeconomic issue. So what of GABA side effects?

GABA Side Effects Include:

The body naturally produces the chemical neurotransmitter Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA is one of 22 amino acids that are used by the body for various purposes. Amino acids can be gotten from food, particularly protein foods. Some of the GABA side effects from supplementing your diet with GABA may include:

–          Tickling, tingling, and itchy sensations (face, neck, and limbs)

–          Shortness of breath

–          sleepiness, or drowsiness

–          anxiety (in high doses)

–          lightheadedness

–          elevated blood pressure and heart rate

–          numbness in the face

–          nausea

–          vomiting

–          flushing sensation

–          fidgeting

–          increase in plasma growth-hormone levels

–          increase in prolactin levels

GABA Side Effects May Be More Severe if Taking Certain Medications

Be careful of GABA side effects if you are taking alcohol, barbiturates, or anti-anxiety drugs (benzodiazepine tranquilizers), or if you have biopolar or unipolar depressive disorders, are or pregnant or nursing.

Itchiness is one particular GABA side effect that appears to go away with time. Usually the itchiness just shows up the first 15 minutes or so after taking GABA.

A doctor can test you to find out if you are low in GABA, or help you with information and advice in case you are having any GABA side effects.

Reference:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23891755

http://www.livestrong.com/article/63549-side-effects-much-gaba/#ixzz2fgcoDcBB

http://extrahappiness.com/happiness/?p=3582#sthash.e2CXcHq7.dpuf

Amino Acid GABA Vital For Normal Brain Activity And Memory

Our brains use on average only 20% of our total energy. But how do they use it? Studying neurotransmitters like the amino acid GABA can lead to a greater understanding of schizophrenia, epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease.

Gamma-Aminobutyric_acid, or GABA, is a non-essential is an amino acid, which is created in our bodies from glutamic acid. It’s a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, essential in maintaining brain function. Simply put, GABA controls neuron activity and prevents nerve cells from firing too often, too quickly.

The activity of GABA in our brains can be measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A study by Lars Michels, Ernst Martin et al, from University Hospital Zurich in Switzerland, was developed to examine GABA neurotransmitter levels in the brains of volunteers performing certain tasks.

Would GABA levels be increased during performance? Would amino acid GABA levels be linked to reaction time and task accuracy? The researchers devised a match-to-sample working memory task, which subjects performed under magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Neurotransmitter GABA’s role in working memory

Working_memory is a theoretical concept, not an actual physical part of our brain. It’s the term for our brain’s ability to examine and manipulate new information. Working memory is associated with cognitive development, and studies show it declines with old age.

Sixteen healthy right-handed volunteers took part in the study. They were shown five letters for a stimulus period of 2 seconds. These letters had to be maintained in memory for a retention period of 5 seconds before a single letter appeared for a probe interval of 2 seconds. The subjects had to indicate by button press whether or not this single letter was part of the stimulus set.

Results showed that GABA levels increased significantly during the working memory test. The amino acid GABA therefore has an essential role in working memory.

Sources:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3317667/

Kill the Pain with Amino Acid GABA – Gamma-aminobutyric acid: Nature’s Pain Killer

Health Benefits of amino acid GABA: Pain Relief, Sleep, and Reduced Anxiety

GABA—known as Gamma-amnobutyric acid—is a chief neurotransmitter with inhibitory effects on the central nervous system of mammals. Because it plays a central role in regulating the excitement of neurons in the brain and nervous sytem, as well as muscle tone in humans, it can be used as a pain killer as since it not only reduces the perception of pain, but also has secondary effects that allows sleep and reduces anxiety once the pain is gone.

GABA is an amino acid, chemically speaking, but in medical and scientific fields it is referred to differently since it is not an alpha amino acid and is not technically incorporated into a protein either. However, Gaba-A and Gaba-B receptor sites in the brain do have a role to play in pain regulation, sleep, and anxiety parts of the human body and psyche.

Perception and mediation of pain: Pain killers as regulated by GABA amino acid

Defining the role of GABA regarding the perception and mediation of the transmission of pain has been attempted by SJ Enna and KE McCarson in the Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, at the University of Kansas Medical Center. They understand why GABA is nature’s pain killer.

Realizing that the central nervous system has GABAergic neurons that are distributed throughout the body, it is the spinal cord dorsal horn that also transmits the impulses of what it perceives as “pain” to the brain. GABA neurons and receptors not only perceive and respond to the stimuli, but these scientists admit that “this neurotransmitter system has been shown to regulate control of sensory information processing in the spinal cord.” This is why GABA plays such an important role in being a natural pain killer and is considered a novel analgesic.

One limitation to GABAergic drugs in the past has been the problem of sedation, or the induction of sleep, which is fine for patients who need to both receive sleep as well as pain relief from this natural pain killer source. However, because it helps with sleep, and not all patients want to sleep but just have the effects of a pain killer, it has shown to be of limited utility. Research continues with GABA-A and GABA-B receptor sites, with the latter being identified with antinociceptive (pain killer) responses “at doses well below those that cause sedation.”

This research has shown hope towards GABA as a pain killer regulator since “stimulation of neuroanatomically discreet GABA receptor sites could be of benefit in the management of pain.” It is good to know that continued research is being done in this area of natural pain killers via GABAergic drugs.

Reference:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17175808