Tyrosine amino acid has a number of health benefits; however, it may not be helpful for skin cancer. That said, related to this is the enzyme tyrosine kinase, which is used to treat thyroid cancer according to some research done at the Department of Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas.

Thyroid cancer statistics from the American Cancer Society includes:

“About 62,980 new cases of thyroid cancer (47,790 in women, and 15,190 in men)
“About 1,890 deaths from thyroid cancer (1,060 women and 830 men)
“Thyroid cancer is commonly diagnosed at a younger age than most other adult cancers. Nearly 2 out of 3 cases are found in people younger than 55 years of age. About 2% of thyroid cancers occur in children and teens.”

Although tyrosine, an essential amino acid (which means your body produces it on its own rather than relying on diet alone). Protein foods like meats, eggs, and fish provide all 22 amino acids. However, the enzyme tyrosine kinase has been researched as a helpful supplement for treating thyroid cancer. Standards for the treatment are needed, but this medical study below examples how tyrosine kinase is an effective cancer treatment.

Tyrosine kinase as a thyroid cancer treatment

Tyrosine kinase is an enzyme that transfers a phosphate group from ATP over to proteins within cells, which attaches to the amino acid tyrosine on these proteins. The enzyme also attaches to other amino acid such as threonine or serine, but tyrosine kinases have a special ability to mutate to an “on” position. This allows growth of the cells to happen, which is extremely important for treating cancer.

These are called tyrosine kinase inhibitors and can help in cancer treatments, including for thyroid cancer.

A study by AA Carhill, ME Cabanillas, et al., in Houston’s Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, have studied tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy in regards to creating standards for treating patients with thyroid cancer.

The researchers needed a “systematic approach to the clinical application of these agents in order to improve patient safety and monitoring promote consistency among providers, and ensure compliance with both institutional and industry standards.”

Their conclusions were based on the tyrosine kinase inhibitor applications they reviewed, including professional guidelines for thyroid cancer, plus reports, trials, and articles, etc., all published in the prior decade. They also included older studies for tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

The research allowed them to develop a “standardized approach related to prescribing commercially available tyrosine kinase inhibitors … for patients with advanced thyroid cancer.”

It is already important to note the already-established knowledge of enzyme-based tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, just as tyrosine and other amino acids are well known for their health benefits, but to help develop a standard for thyroid cancer therapy using enzymes was needed, and the void met.

References:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23185034

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyrosine_kinase

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/thyroidcancer/detailedguide/thyroid-cancer-key-statistics