Tag Archives: eggs

EGGS: The Raw Food Anti-Aging Superfood with Amino Acids

Eggs for anti-aging? Wasn’t the last thing we heard that they had too much cholesterol and were bad for cardiovascular health? According to Dr. Mercola who wrote “Top 7 Food That Slow Your Aging” eggs are one of the superfoods, and he insists that there is no link between consuming eggs and heart disease, to boot. Why? There is a whole list of reasons… some of which include essential amino acids (like arginine, leucine, phenylalanine) and  that raw whole eggs contain.

First of all, says Dr. Mercola, they need to be raw, and organic. This means they also need to be as fresh as possible to reduce the risk of contamination or infection. Furthermore, a single egg contains 9 essential amino acids. This is a fantastic raw item for raw foodists.

Aside from the “highest quality protein you can put in your body,” and that proteins are necessary for building and maintaining your body tissues (skin, muscles, and internal organs), eggs are also important for your hormones and immune system.

Besides the 9 essential amino acids in raw, organic eggs, they include these health benefits:

Zeaxanthin, and Lutein (for your eyes)
Choline (for your brain, cardiovascular- and nervous systems)
Vitamin D

How to choose the best eggs – amino acids, nutrition, omega-3’s, and allergies

Dr. Mercola says that not do we need the 9 essential amino acids in eggs for their anti-aging effects, but we should eat them raw for maximum benefits.

Allergic reactions, he insists, are usually caused by changes in the eggs due to the cooking process. Raw eggs, such as how muscle-builders take in their morning protein shakes, help preserve the highly perishable nutrients that eggs contain.

Raw egg whites contain avidin, a glycoprotein that binds biotin (a B vitamin), which some believe may lead to biotin deficiency; however, although cooking the whites deactivates the avidin, although it also impairs the proteins in the egg. Realize that the yolks also have plenty of biotin, some of the highest found in nature, so if you eat the whole egg raw, you should not be deficient. Eating only the whites may ensure a biotin deficiency.

Avoid omega-3 eggs, says Dr. Mercola, because “they typically come from hens fed poor quality omega-3 fat sources that are already oxidized.”

Be sure to buy organic and TRUE free-range chicken eggs, and preferably locally produced eggs from a pasture farmer. Dr. Mercola suggests requesting them at your local health food store or do a search in your area by visiting www.eatwild.com or www.localharvest.org.

Overall, the amino acids and other health supporting properties of local organic eggs, show many benefits to human health, especially when eaten whole and raw.

Reference:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/02/27/top-7-foods-that-slow-your-aging.aspx

List of 9 Essential Amino Acids in Eggs

Eggs are a protein food that are jam-packed with 9 essential amino acids for your health. Not only do eggs help feed your brain, improve your eyes, are a high source of biotin plus vitamin D, but they also have more protein than any meat.

My mom was told by her naturopathic doctor to eat 4 eggs per day that are high in omega-3’s. This is, of course, to help her macular degeneration. The Lutein and zeaxanthin in eggs may reduce the risk of losing your eyesight due to macular degeneration. So far it seems to be helping her as the degeneration has already slowed or stopped.

The 9 essential amino acids in eggs are listed below, but first, a quick primer on essential versus non-essential amino acids and what that means…

Essential amino acids vs. non-essential amino acids

“Essential” does not mean necessary, but rather that the 9 essential amino acids must be gotten through diet. “Non-essential” means that your body can produce the amino acids on its own, without dietary supplementation.

Sometimes the body is deficient in its ability to make amino acids, and in severe cases it can cause diseases or health problems. In cases where the 9 essential amino acids can come from the food we eat, it is usually enough for our bodies to produce what it needs to survive, and indeed, thrive!

9 essential amino acids in eggs

The list of 9 essential amino acids (plus the list of non-essential aminos) found in eggs and other proteins like beef, chicken, and fish, include:

Essential Nonessential
Histidine Alanine
Isoleucine Arginine
Leucine Aspartic acid
Lysine Cysteine
Methionine Glutamic acid
Phenylalanine Glutamine
Threonine Glycine
Tryptophan Proline
Valine Serine
Tyrosine
Asparagine
Selenocysteine

Each of these 9 essential amino acids are good for different purposes in the human body. Please check out each one of them in other articles that other authors and I have written on this website. And remember, eggs are a near-perfect protein, can be eaten whole, raw or cooked in a variety of ways, and contain all 9 essential amino acids and 12 non-essential amino acids combined!

Please remember to visit our other health news portals, Medicinal Mushroom Information Center at http://medicinalmushroominfo.com Vancouver Health News at http://VancouverHealthNews.ca and http://todayswordofwisdom.com.

Reference:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/02/27/top-7-foods-that-slow-your-aging.aspx

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19759170