Tag Archives: eggs 9 essential amino acids

Amino Acid Chart

Many people know that you can get all 22 amino acids from protein foods such as meats (beef, chicken, pork, lamb, etc.), fish, and even eggs, but some people do not know how many plant-based amino acids in food there are, let alone which ones for which kinds of foods; I will cover some of them here in chart form for easy use.

Below is a breakdown of some of the essential amino acids that are in a variety of vegetarian (non-meat, non-dairy, non-egg, and non-fish) or vegan sources of foods… these are plant-based amino acids. The term “essential” amino acid means that you can only get these kinds of amino acids in food since your body cannot make them on its own.

Amino acids in food from plant proteins

According to the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) an adult needs about 0.8 to 1.0 g protein/kg of body weight. You can calculate this by dividing your weight (in lbs) by 2.2. That is how many grams you need each day of protein.

When you eat protein foods the proteins break down to their basic units called amino acids. Amino acids in food then help build back proteins within the body, needed by muscles, organs, and the immune system. About 15-25% of your daily calories should be from protein foods. Too much protein can strain the liver and kidneys.

Uses of amino acids in food

Arginine is considered as a semi-essential, or “conditional” essential amino acid depending on the health status and what stage of development the individual is in.

Histidine is most important during infancy (utilized for proper development and growth). It is essential for both adults and babies.

Isoleucine is used for muscle production, as well as maintenance and recovery. This is especially important after you have worked out/exercised. It helps in hemoglobin (in red blood cells) formation, blood clotting, energy, and regulating blood sugar levels.

Leucine is used in tissue production, repair, and production of growth hormone. It helps prevent wasting of muscles and is useful in treating Parkinson’s disease.

Lysine is used for calcium absorption, nitrogen maintenance, bone development, hormone production, tissue repair, and antibody production.

Methionine is used as a “cleaner” of the body… it helps emulsify fats, aids in digestion, is an antioxidant (helps prevent cancer), prevents arterial plaque, and removes heavy metals.

Phenylalanine is a precursor for the amino acid tyrosine and signaling molecules such as dopamine, epinephrine (adrenaline), and norepinephrine (noradrenaline), as well as the skin pigment melanin. It helps with memory and learning, elevates moods, and aids in brain processes.

Threonine monitors proteins in the body that processes to maintain and recycle.

Tryptophan is utilized for the production of niacin, serotonin, plus helps in pain management, mood regulation, and aids sleep.

Valine is for the muscles in recovery, endurance, and energy, plus it balances levels of nitrogen. It is also used in treating alcohol-related brain damage.

Amino Acid Chart of Food Sources

AMINO   ACIDS –> Arginine Histidine Isoleucine Leucine Lysine Methionine Phenylalanine Threonine Tryptophan Valine
almonds x x x x x
amaranth x
apples x x x x x x
apricots x
asparagus x x
avocadoes x
bananas x x x
beans x x x x
beets x x x x
black beans x
brazil nuts x x
broccoli x
brussels sprouts x x x
buckwheat x x
carrots x x x x x
cantaloupe x x x x x
cauliflower x x x
cashews x x x
celery x x x
chickpeas x
chives x x
citrus fruits x
coconut x
collards x x
cucumbers x x x
dandelion   greens x x x
endive x
fennel x x
flax seed x x x
garlic x x
grapes x x
greens x
green  vegetables x x
hazelnuts x x
kale x
kidney beans x x
leeks x
legumes x
lentil x
lettuce x x
lima beans x
mushrooms x
nori (seaweed) x x
nutritional yeast x x
nuts x x
oats x
okra x
olives
onion x
papayas x x
parsley x
parsnips x x
pears x x
peas x x
pecans x x
pineapple
pine nuts x x
pomegranates x x x
potatoes x x x
pumpkin seeds x
radishes
rice x
seaweed x
sesame seeds x
snap beans
spinach x
spirulina x
sprouts
squash x
sunflower   seeds x
tomatoes x x
turnip greens
turnips x
walnuts
watercress

There are certain other amino acids in food that could, or even should, be added to this amino acid chart, but this is a good start for most common vegetables, nuts, legumes, and other plant foods.

Amino Acid Chart Reference

http://yumuniverse.com/plant-based-protein-information-chart/

List of 9 Essential Amino Acids in Eggs

Eggs are a protein food that are jam-packed with 9 essential amino acids for your health. Not only do eggs help feed your brain, improve your eyes, are a high source of biotin plus vitamin D, but they also have more protein than any meat.

My mom was told by her naturopathic doctor to eat 4 eggs per day that are high in omega-3’s. This is, of course, to help her macular degeneration. The Lutein and zeaxanthin in eggs may reduce the risk of losing your eyesight due to macular degeneration. So far it seems to be helping her as the degeneration has already slowed or stopped.

The 9 essential amino acids in eggs are listed below, but first, a quick primer on essential versus non-essential amino acids and what that means…

Essential amino acids vs. non-essential amino acids

“Essential” does not mean necessary, but rather that the 9 essential amino acids must be gotten through diet. “Non-essential” means that your body can produce the amino acids on its own, without dietary supplementation.

Sometimes the body is deficient in its ability to make amino acids, and in severe cases it can cause diseases or health problems. In cases where the 9 essential amino acids can come from the food we eat, it is usually enough for our bodies to produce what it needs to survive, and indeed, thrive!

9 essential amino acids in eggs

The list of 9 essential amino acids (plus the list of non-essential aminos) found in eggs and other proteins like beef, chicken, and fish, include:

Essential Nonessential
Histidine Alanine
Isoleucine Arginine
Leucine Aspartic acid
Lysine Cysteine
Methionine Glutamic acid
Phenylalanine Glutamine
Threonine Glycine
Tryptophan Proline
Valine Serine
Tyrosine
Asparagine
Selenocysteine

Each of these 9 essential amino acids are good for different purposes in the human body. Please check out each one of them in other articles that other authors and I have written on this website. And remember, eggs are a near-perfect protein, can be eaten whole, raw or cooked in a variety of ways, and contain all 9 essential amino acids and 12 non-essential amino acids combined!

Please remember to visit our other health news portals, Medicinal Mushroom Information Center at http://medicinalmushroominfo.com Vancouver Health News at http://VancouverHealthNews.ca and http://todayswordofwisdom.com.

Reference:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/02/27/top-7-foods-that-slow-your-aging.aspx

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19759170