Amino acids, like L-isoleucine, may act as a natural painkiller. There are actually a number of amino acids that are involved, and a study was done regarding prostaglandin to see just how much of an analgesic (natural painkiller) and anti-inflammatory these really are.

In order to understand the study done on the amino acids and how they deal with inflammation and work as an analgesic, or natural painkiller, we must understand prostaglandin.

Prostaglandins are on-site lipid compounds work like Aspirin. They are enzymatically derived from fatty acids to serve important bodily functions. Prostaglandins work in a number of ways, but one of them is as a natural painkiller, or analgesic. Analgesics are usually drugs that help your body achieve analgesia (relief from pain).

When injured or ill, prostaglandins—from the 4 amino acids or otherwise—are not secreted from a gland, but are chemically made on-site and used specifically where needed. One of their purposes is to control inflammation.

Amino acids – natural painkiller and anti-inflammatory properties

According to a study done by E Ricciotti and GA FitzGerald on prostaglandins, they act as a natural painkiller and carry an anti-inflammatory response. They said, “prostaglandins may function in both the promotion and resolution of inflammation.” Amino acids can also have an anti-inflammatory response.

In a separate study, RN Saxena, VK Pendse, and NK Khanna “Orally administered L-isoleucine, DL-isoleucine and L-leucine exhibited anti-inflammatory activity in many test models of inflammation except formaldehyde-induced inflammation. L-beta-phenylalanine inhibited carrageenan-induced oedema only.”

However, it was L-isoleucine that exhibited a prolonged analgesic (natural painkiller) effect. In the meantime, DL-isoleucine had a short-lasting effect.

Luckily the amino acids caused no gastric ulceration or acute toxicity in the doses that effectively suppresses inflammation. Their final assessment on these natural painkiller amino acids were that the “anti-inflammatory activity seems to be related with interference with the action and/or synthesis of prostaglandins and deserves further intensive study.”

References:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6335992

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21508345