Category Archives: Stroke

GABA: New Treatment To Improve Recovery After Stroke

Can adjusting the levels of the amino acid GABA improve post-stroke recovery? Results are positive in this animal study, which has led to new hope for stroke patients.

Stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide. And even if the stroke victim survives, the disturbance in the brain’s blood supply—the stroke—can cause brain damage. While some people can and do make a near-complete recovery, many are left with disabilities such as the inability to understand or to speak, or the inability to move limbs on one side of the body.

This damage is often so severe that one third of stroke survivors are confined to nursing homes or institutions.

A Clarkson, B Huang, et al, researchers at the Department of Neurology, The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, LA, USA, hoped to improve post-stroke recovery with drugs. They knew that, depending on the severity of the brain damage, the brain can repair itself after a stroke. The neurons in the brain re-map cognitive functions using non-damaged brain tissue.

The amino acid GABA is critical for this re-mapping process in the brain. GABA is the main neurotransmitter, which means it transmits the signals within the brain. GABA is actually synthesized in the brain, from the amino acid glutamate.

In this animal study, the researchers wanted to examine the brain’s ability to re-map if GABA levels were adjusted.

GABA studied in stroke trial

In this animal study, the researchers analyzed data from post-stroke mice. Stroke caused an increase in extrasynaptic GABA transmission. But when the GABA levels were decreased, the brains showed earlier, and more robust, motor recovery.

The researchers reported that timing is crucial when adjusting GABA levels. It can actually cause more brain damage if done too early. With the mice, the researchers found that delaying treatment until 3 days after stroke improved recovery.

The researchers concluded that targeting GABA helps the brain re-map its neural pathways, which enhances motor recovery. Targeting GABA is therefore a possible treatment in post-stroke recovery.

My personal experience with GABA

I love taking a GABA supplement and the benefits it proposes. It enhances my cognitive function and ensures that my brain is in optimal health. This study is more supporting evidence that brain supplements can be life changing to people all across the globe. If you’re looking for a high quality GABA supplement, look no further than Powdercity. Out of all the other vendors, I find them to be the highest quality, best price and fastest shipping. Their GABA can be found here: http://www.powdercity.com/products/gaba-powder and is offered in 100g, 250g, and 1kg quantities!

 

 

Sources:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21048709

Amino Acid: Glutamate in Stroke Treatment

Preventing brain damage after stroke is the primary goal for stroke treatment. Understanding the balance of brain chemicals—which include amino acids like glutamate (salt/ester of glutamic acid)—can help scientists develop new, successful treatments for stroke. 

Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide. This dangerous condition occurs when the supply of blood to the brain is disturbed. With ischemic strokes, blood supply is decreased (possibly by a blood clot), and rapidly leads to loss of brain function. Stroke can lead to permanent brain damage, when the neurons in the brain are destroyed.

Neurons are nerve cells which transmit information in our central nervous system, which includes our brain. Neuroprotection is the name for treatments which prevent, or slow, the progression of stroke by preventing the loss of neurons. It is also used to treat other central nervous system disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury.

Dr. Myron Ginsberg published an interesting review on ischemic stroke in Neuropharmacology. Dr. Ginsberg, from the Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, in Miami, Florida, covered many experimental neuroprotective treatments, including glutamate antagonism.

The role of glutamate role in treatment for stroke

The amino acid glutamate—sometimes known as or associated with glutamic acid—is one of our brain’s our main excitatory neurotransmitters. Glutamate is involved in cognitive functions such as learning and memory.  But with stroke, excess glutamate can accumulate in the brain. This allows calcium ions to enter the cells. This process is called excitotoxicity, and it causes neuron damage and brain cell death.

Glutamate and other excitatory amino acids interact with receptor-classes, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). Animal studies suggest that treatments which block NMDA receptors could be successful in preventing brain damage after stroke, but only with very early administration. Human trials have not yet been completed.

As further research continues into the role of neurotransmitting amino acids and stroke, it’s possible that a successful neuroprotective treatment using glutamate could be developed.

Sources:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2631228/?report=classic