Some promising news about the treatment of lung cancer was published in the American Journal of Cancer Research. The essential amino acid arginine is being developed into an effective anti-cancer agent. Synthesized arginine/albumin microspheres have been designed to combat lung cancer.

Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. As with all cancers, early detection is the best hope for successful treatment. However, the early stages of lung cancer usually do not produce symptoms. As the cancer advances, symptoms develop, including coughing, wheezing, and coughing up bloody mucus.

Treatment can include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Recent clinical trials have focused on endobronchial intratumoral chemotherapy, which is the direct injection of the drug into the tumor.

Arginine, an essential amino acid, also known as L-arginine, is already proved to inhibit cancer cell proliferation in various cancers, including lung, breast, and gastric cancer cell lines when an appropriate dose is delivered. High concentrations of arginine incudes cancer cell death. Arginine also assembles into clusters to kill cancer cells.

Researchers (HY Lee, KA Mohammed, et al) from the University of Florida, USA, developed a study to investigate the delivery method of L-arginine in endobronchial intratumoral chemotherapy. They designed arginine/albumin microspheres to deliver high concentrations of arginine to the tumors.

Microspheres of synthesized arginine prevent lung cancer cells proliferating

The researchers tested arginine/albumin microspheres on A549, a human lung carcinoma cell line. And arginine/albumin mesospheres (AAMS) were synthesized which promotes arginine clusters. These AAMS consisted of 50% arginine and 50% bovine serum albumin. The minute microspheres were solidified in a centrifuge tube.

This in vitro study produced very positive results. The arginine significantly inhibited cell proliferation, cell migration, and tumor growth of the lung cancer cells. The synthesized AAMS were more effective than freely released arginine, indicating that AAMS could become an ideal delivery vehicle for lung cancer treatments.

Sources:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23841026